Georgia: The Home of Cloisonné

By Natia Malazonia
www.Agora-Gallery.com/ArtistPage/Natia_Malazonia.aspx

Georgia, a country with rich historical and cultural heritage, sits at the crossroads of Europe and Asia along the Black Sea between Russia and Turkey. There are four UNESCO World Heritage sites and much geographic diversity, from popular beach areas like Batumi to the mountainous region of Svaneti. Georgia has a little bit of all the things that are so vital for travelers, including great wine, unique traditions, history, and a beautiful landscape.

In contemporary Georgia (particularly in the art), one can see the confluence of both the traditional and newest trends. In the photo below, you can see the oldest district in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. It is rich with its unique buildings, old apartment blocks, and distinctive architecture. Many buildings in Tbilisi have been taken down and were replaced with modern ones. Luckily, one can still find some of the most exquisite houses in older areas of the city. Their uniqueness lies in the details such as centuries-old doors, carved wooden balconies, beautiful entrances, painted ceilings, and particularly, the decorative cloisonné enamel.

The first samples of cloisonné enamel date back to the 7th century. The art of cloisonné enamel reached its zenith in the 1112th centuries. The famous Khakhuli Triptych, a partially preserved triptych icon of the Theotokos that uses over 100 pieces of Georgian and Byzantine enamel, was created in this period. When I visited the Georgian National Museum of Fine Arts many years ago, I saw the Triptych and was so impressed that I decided to work in cloisonné enamel. I started studying the technique at an art gallery named “Ornament” in 2005, which is the leader in cloisonné art, and have participated in many exhibitions since then internationally.

The first samples of cloisonné enamel date back to the 7th century. The art of cloisonné enamel reached its zenith in the 1112th centuries. The famous Khakhuli Triptych, a partially preserved triptych icon of the Theotokos that uses over 100 pieces of Georgian and Byzantine enamel, was created in this period. When I visited the Georgian National Museum of Fine Arts many years ago, I saw the Triptych and was so impressed that I decided to work in cloisonné enamel. I started studying the technique at an art gallery named “Ornament” in 2005, which is the leader in cloisonné art, and have participated in many exhibitions since then internationally.

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